Surgical bleeding can adversely affect patient outcomes, hospital costs and resources

Up to 68% of cases in open procedures experience disruptive bleeding events despite the use of haemostats1

Up to 68% of cases in open procedures experience disruptive bleeding events despite the use of haemostats1

Challenging and uncontrollable bleeding during surgery is associated with increased mortality rates1,2

Challenging and uncontrollable bleeding during surgery is associated with increased mortality rates1,2

Complications related to surgical bleeding may increase resource utilization3-7

Complications related to surgical bleeding may increase resource utilization3-7

Compared to primary methods of hemostasis alone, adjunctive hemostats have been associated with reduced use of hospital resources in the following ways:

Up to 35% fewer patients require blood transfusions

Up to 35% fewer patients require blood transfusions8-13

Up to 4 days shorter length of hospital stay8-15

Up to 4 days shorter length of hospital stay8-15

Up to 25 minutes reduced operating time14-15

Up to 25 minutes reduced operating time14-15

Clarifying the Confusion16

Clarifying the Confusion16

An Ethicon study found that, when confronted with bleeding, surgeons consider the site and the situation as the primary factors in choosing which adjunctive haemostat to use. From the study and based on surgeon input, five categories emerged to describe the bleeding situations that surgeons encounter. These five bleeding situations are:

  • Continuous oozing
  • Problematic bleeding
  • Difficult-to-access bleeding
  • Potential re-bleeding risk
  • High-pressure vessel bleeding16
Commit

Commit

Haemostasis Optimisation Program (HOP) is a partnership program that is designed to improve utilization of adjunctive haemostats through a systematic approach that will:

  • Evaluate product Use
  • Educate Surgical teams
  • Provide recommendations for product use

HOP demonstrated in a real-world setting that it can help hospitals achieve substantial cost savings by shifting to a more cost-effective use of haemostats— without sacrificing effectiveness or affecting patient outcomes.16

The hospital in which the HOP research was conducted in 2016-2017, saw a 15% reduction in spending per hemostat unit over the course of a year. The annual cost savings to the hospital exceeded $168,000.16

References

*Compared to primary methods of hemostasis alone (117999-190704 EMEA)

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